How To Find The Best Care Homes For Dementia Patients

How To Find The Best Care Homes For Dementia Patients

Each elderly person's dementia manifests and progresses differently, making it difficult to decide whether to seek residential care for a loved one. Someone in the early stages of the condition may just require occasional assistance, while another may require regular assistance.

Choosing the best dementia care facility means ensuring your loved ones get the best care for dementia patients in nursing homes. It's difficult to know where to begin, and family members may feel overwhelmed. The list of possibilities below, together with questions to ask and other resources, can assist you in getting started.

Do Your Research

Discuss local facilities with members of your support group, a social worker, the person suffering from dementia, and their family doctor, family members, and friends. This will help align everyone to the care plan the patient will be receiving long-term. 

It's also ideal if you check out sites like the Joint Commission's Quality Check® and Medicare's Nursing Home Compare. The next best approach is to prepare a list of questions for the care facility to ensure you get all the answers you're looking for. Call to schedule an appointment and ensure you get a tour of the facility's premises. 

Ensure There Are Memory Care Units

Many nursing homes provide specialist memory care units for dementia patients, including medical treatment, physical and occupational therapy if necessary, and personnel specially trained to care for dementia patients. 

Memory care facilities also provide scheduled activities tailored to dementia patients and social activities, including dances, games, arts & crafts, and more.

Consider Residential Care

Moving a loved one to a dementia care home is difficult, but it's frequently the best way to ensure they receive the care they require. There are four major categories:

  • Retirement Homes: This environment is better for someone with early dementia who can still care for oneself and live alone but would struggle to manage a whole house. These facilities do not have 24-hour supervision in most cases, and the staff may be unfamiliar with dementia.
  • Basic Assisted Living: This is the transition from living independently to a nursing home. Assisted living facilities provide lodging, meals, and any other assistance your loved one requires, such as help with tasks or bathing.
  • Nursing Homes: This may be the greatest option for someone who needs 24-hour care and long-term medical therapy. A good nursing home will be able to provide a variety of requirements, including daily care, social activities, spirituality, nutrition, and medical treatment. Dementia-specific units are available in several facilities.
  • Continuum Care Retirement Communities: These provide all levels of residential care in one location, including independent living, assisted living, and nursing home services. When residents' requirements change, they can transfer inside the facility to receive alternative services.

Find Adult Day Care Programs

Adult daycare programs provide supervision and social activities for patients who cannot stay at home by themselves during the day but do not require full-time nursing care. Socialization can aid memory retention, and most programs also include other cognitively beneficial activities.

Creating a safe living environment for elderly folks with dementia is a group effort. Whether you plan to move them to an adult day care center or get them basic assisted living, ensuring you check off the boxes to get the best care home for dementia patients in your family is a must. 

If you're keen on finding out more about the best practices in dementia care, visit Senior Strong today!

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